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dc.contributor.advisorMichael Triantafyllou.en_US
dc.contributor.authorElhassid, Raz.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-18T21:49:59Z
dc.date.available2020-10-18T21:49:59Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/128085
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 77).en_US
dc.description.abstractBiomimetics, nature inspiring technology, is the concept of imitating nature models for the purpose of solving complex problems [1]. Finding the right analogs from biology to technology, transferring, and applying them correctly can potentially make a big difference in improving a system. In this thesis, we investigated and verified the impact of different dorsal fins sizes on the REMUS 100 AUV's ability to maneuver. Observing the past work of Triantafyllou [2] and Ross [3] that suggested better maneuverability capabilities, continued by Prestero [4] and Trakht [5] that provided theoretical and simulation tools for better understanding the impact of fins on maneuverability, and Winey's work [6] that produced empirical data to support Triantafyllou's theoretical work, we will now follow the conclusions of previous works and provide the appropriate conditions to meet the requirements for better maneuverability.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe towing tank at MIT Sea Grant is equipped with four motors, allowing the model to have 3 degrees of freedom: longitudinal direction (x), transverse (y), and radial motion around the vertical direction (z). Using this equipment, we made yaw and sway experiments of a modified scaled-down model based on the REMUS 100 (Remote Environmental Monitoring Unit), which was developed by C. von Alt and associates at the Oceanographic System Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution [7]. In this work, we reduced the area of the front fin and rudder in order to be close to the instability point. Using the towing tank to generate oscillating sinusoidal motion to the REMUS model, we made a series of experiments in combinations of different fin locations, frequencies, and fin sizes. We compared the results to the original model as described by Triantafyllou et al. [6], as to theoretical calculations performed by Triantafyllou [8], and Hoerner [9],[10].en_US
dc.description.abstractScaling up the results using a similitude method, we could simulate the maneuverability characteristics of the REMUS 100 AUV. We quantified and verified that minimizing the stability criterion indeed provide better maneuvering performance in terms of the radius of turning, turning rate, surge velocity, and drift angle. Providing a method of optimizing an existing model, we showed ways to minimize the stability criterion to a specific required value, while verifying the conditions needed to do so.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Raz Elhassid.en_US
dc.format.extent87 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleExperimental verification of biomimetically designed ventral fins for AUVsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1200041536en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inNavalArchitectureandMarineEngineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dspace.imported2020-10-18T21:49:57Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentMechEen_US


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