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dc.contributor.advisorMaura O'Connor.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFritts, Rachel(Rachel A.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-05T23:11:20Z
dc.date.available2021-01-05T23:11:20Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/128984
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies/Writing, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 15-17).en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen a single remaining population of black-footed ferrets was discovered in Meeteetse, Wyoming in 1981, scientists had one last chance to save North America's only native ferret from extinction. Though the discovered population numbered over 100 individuals when it was found, ferrets began to die at an alarming rate just a few years after the rediscovery of the species. With their options running out, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service made the drastic choice of pulling every single surviving ferret into captivity. Thanks to decades of captive breeding and release efforts involving hundreds of people, there are now a few hundred black-footed ferrets back in the wild today. The black-footed ferret recovery effort has yet to overcome its greatest challenge, however: plague. Keeping ferrets alive in the wild is time consuming and cost intensive. Every wild ferret needs to be rounded up and vaccinated, and insecticides are sprayed over hundreds of thousands of acres each year to stave off the looming threat of a plague outbreak. To make matters worse, ferrets are becoming more inbred each year, making them even more susceptible to disease. Recently the black-footed ferret recovery effort has turned to cutting-edge genetic technologies to introduce more diversity into the ferret line, and, eventually, resistance to the plague. Some researchers think that such drastic measures might now be the only way for black-footed ferrets to ever have a hope of surviving on their own in the wild again.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Rachel Fritts.en_US
dc.format.extent17 pages ;en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.subjectGraduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.titlePlague on the Prairie : the fight to save black-footed ferrets from the West's most insidious diseaseen_US
dc.title.alternativeFight to save black-footed ferrets from the West's most insidious diseaseen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMIT Comparative Media Studies/Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Theses Program in Science Writing
dc.identifier.oclc1227040739en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inScienceWriting Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies/Writingen_US
dspace.imported2021-01-05T23:11:19Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentCMSen_US


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