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dc.contributor.advisorBrian W. Anthony.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTresansky, Anne Joyal Pigula.en_US
dc.contributor.otherHarvard--MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-06T18:31:35Z
dc.date.available2021-01-06T18:31:35Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/129150
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, September, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 101-121).en_US
dc.description.abstractDiagnostic ultrasound (US) is a safe and inexpensive imaging technology that is widely used for qualitative assessment of anatomic features much larger than a wavelength, at least several millimeters in size. Statistical analysis of US envelope signals can provide information about scattering from structures that are smaller than a wavelength, and can therefore provide information on tissue composition and organization that would otherwise require a biopsy. The Homodyned K (HK) distribution is the most general in the family of random walk envelope distributions, which are strongly grounded in a physical modeling of scattering and therefore are ideal for tissue characterization purposes. In this thesis, several issues are considered that relate to the implementation and interpretation of the HK distribution. The physical interpretations of the HK parameters are explored, providing greater context and understanding for clinical applications. A novel parameter estimation algorithm based on the Levenberg-Marquardt curve-fitting algorithm is presented, and it is shown to be more robust in the presence of image artifacts than the gold standard. The effects of a single-element US imaging system on HK parameters are characterized, enabling calibration and therefore system-independent measurements. Finally, two animal studies are presented that use HK parameters to characterize skeletal muscle and liver in mouse models. These results represent progress towards implementing the HK distribution as a system-independent, clinically useful technology.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Anne Joyal Pigula Tresansky.en_US
dc.format.extent121 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectHarvard--MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.titleStatistical analysis of ultrasound signals for tissue characterization : the Homodyned K Distributionen_US
dc.title.alternativeHomodyned K Distributionen_US
dc.title.alternativeHK Distributionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in Medical Engineering and Medical Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technologyen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1227276708en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D.inMedicalEngineeringandMedicalPhysics Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technologyen_US
dspace.imported2021-01-06T18:31:33Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentHSTen_US


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