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dc.contributor.advisorIsaac L. Chuang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHedglin, Nolan R.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-06T18:32:56Z
dc.date.available2021-01-06T18:32:56Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/129179
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, September, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Program, September, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 97-110).en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom advancements in time transfer to networked science, quantum networks can enable a new host of experiments that would not otherwise be achievable. We can learn a lot about building such a network to connect quantum resources globally through international cooperation. Toward this end, we argue that the countries best equipped to forge the path for building a global quantum network are the two largest countries spearheading research in the field: the U.S. and China. An analysis of each country's innovation landscape tells us that their primary interest in quantum technology is motivated by the desire to modernize their military. Both countries may be apprehensive to collaborate because the perceived security risks of a knowledge exchange far outweigh the benefits they would receive in accelerating innovation. Any proposal for a joint project is mired in the urgent geopolitical crisis that is U.S.-China relations. As escalatory retaliation, the U.S. has adopted a policy of innovation isolationism since ²0¹9 in an effort to minimize scientific and technological exchanges between the two countries. We argue that the U.S. security framework needs a paradigm shift because the country cannot address several major vulnerabilities in its current security posture without building bilateral stability with China. To support this claim, we describe how a lack of bilateral stability could create unnecessary escalation in cyberspace and hinder each country's ability to solve global security issues such as climate change. Drawing upon the historical analogy of U.S.-U.S.S.R. cooperation in space exploration during the Cold War, we propose a framework for a joint quantum project that can achieve U.S. scientific and diplomatic goals alike. Finally, we present experimental work being done at MIT Lincoln Laboratory to better understand some of the technical challenges associated with building a bilateral quantum link.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Nolan R. Hedglin.en_US
dc.format.extent110 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleOpportunities for U.S.-China scientific collaboration in building a bilateral quantum networken_US
dc.title.alternativeOpportunities for US-China scientific collaboration in building a bilateral quantum networken_US
dc.title.alternativeOpportunities for United States -China scientific collaboration in building a bilateral quantum networken_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Programen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1227278158en_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.MassachusettsInstituteofTechnology,DepartmentofElectricalEngineeringandComputerScienceen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inTechnologyandPolicy Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Programen_US
dspace.imported2021-01-06T18:32:55Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentTPPen_US
mit.thesis.departmentESDen_US
mit.thesis.departmentIDSSen_US


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