Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorTakehiko Nagakura.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zhujing,M. ArchMassachusetts Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-19T20:54:06Z
dc.date.available2021-02-19T20:54:06Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/129914
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, February, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 45-47).en_US
dc.description.abstractHumans are increasingly disconnected from nature. Urbanization, resource exploitation, and changes in ways of living have diminished people's access to nature. Exposure to nature is beneficial to human beings in many aspects. Researches in environmental psychology and public health have shown the positive impacts of nature connections for people's happiness, concentration, and restoration. In creating the living environment with the connectedness to nature, various researches have been invested, such as the study of green space in the living environment, the application of virtual nature in psychiatric and medical care, the implementation of natural scenery in augmented reality. However, the idea of imitating natural phenomena in the built environment via tangible building systems has not been explored yet. This thesis aims to provide people with the perception of connectedness to nature in the built environment by embedding the sensory experience of nature, Komorebi, in the building system. Komorebi is a Japanese term that describes the dappled sunlight filtered through tree foliage. Through analysis of this visual effect and experimenting with various materials and actuators, a daylight-filtering system is developed to bring the dappled light phenomenon into the built environment. Environmental performance simulations of the Komorebi system is conducted in comparison with no-shading and the Venitian blind. The system builds on the existing infrastructure to integrate elements of improvisational nature into the building system, creating natural sensory experiences in the built environment. In practice, it would have great potential at places where natural connections are limited, and relinking occupants to nature would be highly beneficial. The impact of this work includes 1) creating a port for people who have limited access to nature due to work demand or mobility limitation, 2) invoking people's memories in nature, and encouraging more exposure to nature.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Zhujing Zhang.en_US
dc.format.extent47 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleKomorebi : embedding dappled sunlight in the built environmenten_US
dc.title.alternativeEmbedding dappled sunlight in the built environmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1237109786en_US
dc.description.collectionM.Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architectureen_US
dspace.imported2021-02-19T20:53:36Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentArchen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record