Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRafi Segal and Brent D. Ryan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTitelboim, Yair(Yair Yakov)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-19T21:03:57Z
dc.date.available2021-02-19T21:03:57Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_US
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/129932
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, February, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Architecture Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, February, 2020en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 214-223).en_US
dc.description.abstractTackling the problem of obsolescence in North American cities, this thesis interrogates the question of how we should plan for the regeneration of aging office buildings. I argue that current whole-building, coarse-grained office-to-residential conversion results in entire urban neighborhoods turning into "sanitized vertical suburbia" (Moss 2017) that fail to create balanced, affordable, and inclusive communities. In response, this thesis offers a new floor-by-floor "fine-grained" (Lynch 1981) framework for space conversion. As a case study, I look at conversions In Manhattan's busy financial district that have created an instant elite neighborhood, with 10,000 new luxury units developed over the past fifteen years. To address hyper-gentrification generated by current conversion methods, I introduce a 3D Design and Data Toolkit (DDT) that redefines the conversion process and offers a selective, floor-by-floor approach to balance the quantity and mix of new residential units with the quality of urban life. This tool helps city planners, urban designers, and developers identify spaces for conversion and match demand and supply across scales. As such, this work offers a strategic, multi-scaled approach aimed at reducing grain, increasing market potential, and reinforcing urban vitality in a new conversion process.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Yair Titelboim.en_US
dc.format.extent237 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses may be protected by copyright. Please reuse MIT thesis content according to the MIT Libraries Permissions Policy, which is available through the URL provided.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleGranular urbanism : adaptive strategies for obsolete downtown neighborhoodsen_US
dc.title.alternativeAdaptive strategies for obsolete downtown neighborhoodsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Architecture Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1237269528en_US
dc.description.collectionM.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.description.collectionS.M.inArchitectureStudies Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architectureen_US
dspace.imported2021-02-19T21:03:27Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeMasteren_US
mit.thesis.departmentUrbStuden_US
mit.thesis.departmentArchen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record