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dc.contributor.advisorAnne Vernez-Moudon.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrontado Saavedra, Jose Guillermoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-04T16:08:00Z
dc.date.available2005-08-04T16:08:00Z
dc.date.copyright1980en_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/16063
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Arch.A.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1980.en_US
dc.descriptionMICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ROTCH.en_US
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 156-162.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis Thesis involves an analysis and a description of the structure of physical space of the Latin America Colonial Cities. The section of the document known as Leyes de Indias which deals with the urbanistic norms and the prescriptions for the laying out of the colonial cities, and the cities founded within the first three centuries of the colonial period, are the most important elements of this thesis. Several issues are to be discussed throughout the work and the most important ones are: The social and political context underlying the building up of the vast network of new cities in Latin America, The characteristics of that network and the means to control its development. The colonial city as resulting from the application of such means of control, or in other words, of the prescriptions contained in the Laws of Indias. The changes produced by contradictions on what was prescribed by those Laws and identified through a systematic observation of the available sample of cities. The reasons behind those changes. The relevancy of this work in terms of the current trends of development of Venezuelan cities. The process oriented and the product oriented views of this issue. Finally, the material is presented in two major parts containing, the first, an analysis of the context and the objectives from where the Laws of Indias were derived, of the hypothesis concerning the sources from where the Spanish planners drew those urbanistic norms, and, a description of the structure of physical space as prescribed by the Laws of Indias. The second part contains the description of the structure of physical space, and the substantiation of that description, as resulting from the application of the prescriptions and norms contained in the Laws. The substantiation is made through previous studies from Latin American, European and North America authors. The conclusion of this second part and at the same time, of the whole work, is a recompilation of those issues and of various speculations concerning their relation with today's city.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jose Guillermo Frontado Saavedra.en_US
dc.format.extent162 p.en_US
dc.format.extent30021616 bytes
dc.format.extent30021371 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCities and towns Latin Americaen_US
dc.subject.lcshCity planning Latin Americaen_US
dc.subject.lcshCities and towns Venezuelaen_US
dc.subject.lcshCity planning Venezuelaen_US
dc.titleLas Leyes de Indias : observations of its influence on the physical space in the Latin American colonial citiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Arch.A.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc07477368en_US


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