Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDavid J. Perreault.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWahby, Riad Samir, 1981-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-05-17T14:56:46Z
dc.date.available2005-05-17T14:56:46Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/16690
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 75-78).en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.description.abstractA significant factor driving the development of power conversion technology is the need to increase performance while reducing size and improving efficiency. In addition, there is a desire to increase the level of integration of DC-DC converters in order to take advantage of the cost and other benefits of batch fabrication techniques. While advances in the power density and integration of DC-DC converters have been realized through development of better active device technologies, much room for improvement remains in the size and fabrication of passive components. To achieve these improvements, a substantial increase in operating frequency is needed, since intermediate energy storage requirements are inversely proportional to frequency. Unfortunately, traditional power conversion techniques are ill-suited to handle this dramatic escalation of switching frequency. New architectures have been proposed which promise to deliver radical performance improvements while potentially reaching microwave frequencies. These new architectures promise to enable substantial miniaturization of DC-DC converters and to permit much a higher degree of integration. The principal effort of this thesis is the development of design and characterization methods for rectifier topologies amenable to use in the new architectures. A computational design approach allowing fast and accurate circuit analysis and synthesis is developed and applied, along with traditional analysis, to two demonstrative rectifier topologies. In addition, the application of coupled magnetic structures for parasitic mitigation is considered. Experimental implementations are investigated to verify analytic and computational results.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Riad Samir Wahby.en_US
dc.format.extent120 p.en_US
dc.format.extent587649 bytes
dc.format.extent587357 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleRadio frequency rectifiers for DC-DC power conversionen_US
dc.title.alternativeRadio frequency rectifiers for direct current-direct current power conversionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc57204599en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record