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dc.contributor.advisorGregory A. Kirkos.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-05-19T14:25:31Z
dc.date.available2005-05-19T14:25:31Z
dc.date.copyright2000en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/16739
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2000.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 135-138).en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1997, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories commenced a project with the objectives of reducing the risk, cost and time associated with obtaining time critical battlefield reconnaissance data. The Wide Area Surveillance Projective, or WASP, is a small autonomous flyer, which is launched contained in an artillery shell, and then deployed over the battlefield to capture images. The first phase of this project involved identifying and solving the challenges associated with designing a device capable of surviving launch loads of 15,000 g’s. The second phase of WASP is currently addressing the manufacturing and flight control issues. The focus of this thesis is on the structural design and manufacture of the WASP vehicle, particularly the aft fuselage section and the wings. The aft section is not only subjected to high impulsive inertial loads, but its weight (being aft of the center of pressure) has a substantial effect on the controllability of the vehicle. Finite element models of this section as well as test specimens are produced to optimize the design. The wings are required to be stiff aerodynamic surfaces, and are folded along the side of the vehicle so as to take up minimal volume. Several different manufacturing procedures are explored to provide a robust set of wings that match all of the specified requirements. All of these pieces need to be as light as possible; therefore they are manufactured in advanced composite materials.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Seth Stovack Kessler.en_US
dc.format.extent156 p.en_US
dc.format.extent2969539 bytes
dc.format.extent2969291 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleDesign and manufacture of a high-G unmanned aerial vehicle structureen_US
dc.title.alternativeHigh-G unmanned aerial vehicle structureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc45617369en_US


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