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dc.contributor.advisorRobert Gallager.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchein, Brett E. (Brett Eric)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-05-19T14:35:14Z
dc.date.available2005-05-19T14:35:14Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/16786
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 227-231).en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.description.abstractConstructing a large-scale wireless data network is spectacularly expensive. It is therefore important to understand how to efficiently utilize the physical infrastructure and available battery power, which are expensive system resources. Unfortunately, we currently understand very little about efficient communication in a distributed environment. In distributed wireless networks, there appears to be an interesting and complex trade-off between trying to take advantage of independent noisy signals at different relays and closely coordinating relay transmissions to a receiver. Designing the right structure for efficient communication, by choice of source transmission codebook and relay terminal processing, is the important and difficult problem on which we focus. We use an information theoretic framework to study several very simple multiple terminal networks, focusing exclusively on single source, single destination networks where communication must take place through intermediate nodes. Our goal is to determine how much data we can get reliably from source to destination, placing no importance on delay or computational complexity. The core problem then involves distributed detection at the intermediate nodes and coordination in relaying information to the destination.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Brett E. Schein.en_US
dc.format.extent231 p.en_US
dc.format.extent1678843 bytes
dc.format.extent1678596 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleDistributed coordination in network information theoryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc49839193en_US


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