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dc.contributor.advisorNeil Gershenfeld.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Richard R. (Richard Ribon)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-02T16:24:37Z
dc.date.available2005-06-02T16:24:37Z
dc.date.copyright2002en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17615
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2002.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 220-222).en_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral implementations of chipless RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tags are presented and discussed as low-cost alternatives to chip-based RFID tags and sensors. An overview of present-day near-field electromagnetic tagging is presented, including both chip-based and chipless technologies with associated costs. As a candidate for low-cost ID tags, a design theory and implementation is presented for multiply-resonant planar metal structures. This theory includes a circuit model, a phenomenological model, and a framework for predicting the resonant frequencies as a function of geometrical and material properties. A novel physical geometry, a tree-like spiral structure, is proposed as a design that increases the number of resonances per unit area in a planar structure relative to the present day state-of-the-art. In addition to identification, it is shown how several chipless tags can also be designed to function as sensors. Several examples are discussed in detail, including: 1) a family of thermal sensor tags employing magnetic materials and 2) a family of sensor tags (to sense pressure, humidity, and pH) based on planar resonator structures. The latter section of the dissertation describes the evolution of my work in developing the necessary (and low-cost) instrumentation to support these new varieties of tag technologies, ranging from a $500 frequency-agile reader to a $5 reader for toy applications.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Richard Ribon Fletcher.en_US
dc.format.extent222 p.en_US
dc.format.extent11628751 bytes
dc.format.extent11628559 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleLow-cost electromagnetic tagging : design and implementationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc54665677en_US


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