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dc.contributor.advisorJ. Mark Schuster.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMontañez, Carlos Javier, 1975-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-02T18:16:56Z
dc.date.available2005-06-02T18:16:56Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17693
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2004.en_US
dc.description"June 2004."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 88).en_US
dc.description.abstractLittle attention has been paid to the quality of the spaces within rapid mass transit stations in the United States, and their importance as places in and of themselves. For many city dwellers who rely on rapid transit service as their primary mode of travel, descending and ascending into and from transit stations is an integral part of daily life and their urban experience. Beyond being simply a piece of infrastructure offering mobility throughout a city, transit stations are an important part of the daily morning and evening rituals for many transit riders in cities with such rapid transit systems. Given their importance, it is surprising how underutilized are the interiors of stations as well as how poorly stations reveal what lies within their walls. The purpose of this thesis is to examine how ancillary uses affect the station environment; how non-elevated mass rapid transit stations within the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Area (MBTA) system are being improved through ancillary uses; which uses are particularly beneficial to transit authorities and riders alike as well as which uses require additional operations considerations; and to make suggestions as to how to further improve the station environments through the continued use of ancillary uses.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Carlos Javier Montañez.en_US
dc.format.extent88 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent3251202 bytes
dc.format.extent3251009 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleMaximizing the benefits of mass transit stations : amenities, services, and the improvement of urban space within spacesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning
dc.identifier.oclc56403283en_US


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