Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorJohn-Paul Barrington Clarke.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbad, Antonio Manuel, 1976-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-02T18:30:22Z
dc.date.available2005-06-02T18:30:22Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17751
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionLeaf 157 blank.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 123-124).en_US
dc.description.abstractA motivation exists to formulate and implement new tools and methodologies to address the problem of congestion in the National Airspace System (NAS). This thesis presents a novel methodology for allocating aircraft among En Route flight levels as a means to mitigate air traffic congestion and stakeholder operating costs. The core of the methodology is a decision-aiding tool comprised of a Mixed-Integer Linear Program (MILP) that is solved using a an A* Search-based Branch & Bound framework. Two metrics, measuring cumulative delay reduction and fuel burn savings, are used to benchmark the performance of the methodology. A combination of these two metrics is also explored as a means to minimize overall airline operating costs. A subsection of the Northeast Corridor is modeled and forms part of the analytic structure used to quantify the potential benefits of the proposed methodology. Simulations are generated from these models in order to gain an understanding of the benefits as they relate to varying NAS conditions. The following scenarios were modeled: 1) A baseline single jetway corridor, 2) Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM), 3) Miles in Trail (MIT) restrictions on corridor traffic, and 4) the merging of Terminal Area air traffic with En route air traffic. Thus, this research also provides a preliminary, quantitative measure of the delay reduction, fuel burn savings and operating cost savings possible under each scenario, within a NAS corridor setting. Results indicate that 8.5 minutes of delay reduction per flight can be achieved when minimizing air traffic delay. Similarly, 16.47 kg/min of fuel burn savings per flight can be achieved when minimizing air traffic fuel burn. Instituting RVSM procedures result in an additional 45% of delayen_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) reduction. Imposing MIT restrictions result in a 41% loss of delay reduction savings. These results were obtained for corridor simulations of 30 minutes in duration. Finally, the methodology is shown to be effective for use as a decision-aiding tool to merge air traffic streams.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Antonio Manuel Abad.en_US
dc.format.extent157 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent6004845 bytes
dc.format.extent6004650 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleUsing tactical flight level resource allocation to alleviate congested en-route airspaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
dc.identifier.oclc56523481en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record