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dc.contributor.advisorEric Von Hippel.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMollick, Ethan, 1975-en_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-02T19:07:41Z
dc.date.available2005-06-02T19:07:41Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17904
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 96-101).en_US
dc.description.abstractFor almost every complex, proprietary system there is a group of users trying to change, modify, or break it. These users have no regard for the carefully constructed business models that manufacturers use to justify their closed architectures. Instead, driven by utility, curiosity, or, occasionally, anger, these user communities innovate within the manufacturers' systems, bypassing both legal and technical safeguards. These communities exist in many diverse markets, most often as a hunted underground, but occasionally as valued partners of legitimate industry. In the computer industry, for example, they are called "hackers," while in the world of telephony they are referred to as "phreakers." Sometimes undermining systems and sometimes expanding them, these parasitic innovation communities have a deep and complex relationship with the companies whose systems they modify. This thesis presents an examination of the phenomenon of parasitic innovation, developing explanations for how and why parasitic communities operate. It demonstrates that parasitic innovation is an ongoing phenomenon that has developed significant innovations over the last forty years. The paper then presents a model for how parasitic communities and firms interact, and offers a new strategic approach for how industry can better develop the positive effects of parasitic innovators while reducing negative impacts.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ethan Mollick.en_US
dc.format.extent112 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent6642133 bytes
dc.format.extent6653832 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.titleInnovations from the underground : towards a theory of parasitic innovationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc56676051en_US


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