Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLarry Rudolph.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNigam, Atish, 1981-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-06-02T19:25:38Z
dc.date.available2005-06-02T19:25:38Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17962
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 63-65).en_US
dc.description.abstractUser level debugging of pervasive environments is important as it provides the ability to observe changes that occur in a pervasive environment and fix problems that result from these changes, especially since pervasive environments may from time to time exhibit unexpected behavior. Simple keepalive messages can not always uncover the source of this behavior because systems can be in an incorrect state while continuing to output information or respond to basic queries. The traditional approach to debugging distributed systems is to instrument the entire environment. This does not work when the environments are cobbled together from systems built around different operating systems, programming languages or platforms. With systems from such disparate backgrounds, it is hard to create a stable pervasive environment. We propose to solve this problem by requiring each system and component to provide a health metric that gives an indication of its current status. Our work has shown that, when monitored at a reasonable rate, simple and cheap metrics can reveal the cause of many problems within pervasive environments. The two metrics that will be focused on in this thesis are transmission rate and transmission data analysis. Algorithms for implementing these metrics, within the stated assumptions of pervasive environments, will be explored along with an analysis of these implementations and the results they provided. Furthermore, a system design will be described in which the tools used to analyze the metrics compose an out of bound monitoring system that retains a level of autonomy from the pervasive environment. The described system provides many advantages and additionally operates under the given assumptions regarding the resources availableen_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) within a pervasive environment.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Atish Nigam.en_US
dc.format.extent65 p.en_US
dc.format.extent3786270 bytes
dc.format.extent3792626 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleAnalytical techniques for debugging pervasive computing environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc57138467en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record