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dc.contributor.advisorRalph Gakenheimer and Joseph M. Sussman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMahendra, Anjali, 1977-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-mx---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-09-26T15:52:06Z
dc.date.available2005-09-26T15:52:06Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/27862
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning; and, (S.M. in Transportation)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 137-143).en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) academics, researchers, and practitioners interested in improving transportation and air quality in the region. The survey shows that there is hesitation in considering any such policy in the MCMA without prior improvements in public transport. In light of these findings, we have outlined the complicated issues surrounding implementation, with recommendations for a course of action given the current policy agenda. The findings presented in this thesis can be used by decision makers in Mexico City to design a set of policies for improving mobility, with a better understanding of the issues surrounding congestion pricing.en_US
dc.description.abstractCar ownership in many large cities of the developing world is rapidly increasing with rising incomes, and is accompanied by traffic gridlock, travel delays, and deteriorating air quality. The policy of congestion pricing to manage growing travel demand has been implemented with varying degrees of success in some developed countries. This thesis explores the applicability of congestion pricing in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Current transportation policies in the MCMA were studied, with an analysis of the factors causing increased demand for private transport. Of the many forms in which congestion pricing may be implemented, we focused on the possibility of a central city congestion zone similar to that recently implemented in the city of London, providing arguments for its viability, and preliminary analyses regarding potential impacts. We studied how household level car ownership had changed for different income groups in Mexico City between 1994 and 2000, in order to make empirical estimates of the distributional impacts that a congestion pricing scheme might have. Our results show that the location of low income car owning households far from the central areas, and their limited access to efficient public transport creates negative consequences for them. Yet, significant overall reductions in traffic and travel time savings are possible with a congestion charge. Lower income people can benefit if the revenues from congestion pricing are used to improve their accessibility to public transport. Congestion pricing is difficult to implement, especially given the decentralization and overlapping levels of political authority in the MCMA. As part of this research, we surveyed various Mexican government officials,en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Anjali Mahendra.en_US
dc.format.extent143 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent2436353 bytes
dc.format.extent2590084 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleCongestion pricing in cities of the developing world : exploring prospects in Mexico Cityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Transportationen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning
dc.identifier.oclc60250189en_US


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