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dc.contributor.advisorRobert A. Greenes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanauer, David Alan, 1973-en_US
dc.contributor.otherHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-09-27T17:10:29Z
dc.date.available2005-09-27T17:10:29Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/28586
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 95-104).en_US
dc.description.abstractAutomated computer technologies utilizing e-mail or SMS text messaging reminders can help overcome adherence barriers to optimal glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Text messaging on cellular phones, in particular, has become a popular communications tool among adolescents and young adults. We have created an automated computer system that provides reminders to check blood sugars by e-mail or text messaging on a cellular phone. The reminder schedule is set on a password-protected web site by the user according to his or her preferences. Users can respond to the reminders with their blood sugars, which are time and date stamped and then stored in a database. Text parsing rules allow users to override the time and date and to attach a comment as well. The blood sugar log can later be viewed and edited on the web site. Positive feedback is provided for every blood sugar entered and users also have the option to have both general and diabetes facts sent to them daily at random times via e-mail or text messaging. A randomized, controlled trial comparing e-mail with text messaging is underway at the time of this writing to test the feasibility and utility of this system in patients with diabetes. Preliminary results from 10 users (mean age 18.9 [plus-minus] 2.0 years) indicate that the system appeals to a subset of the study population. Two of the ten subjects have been using the system consistently, each submitting an average of 1.3 and 2.7 blood sugars per day, respectively. Only 4 of the 51 blood sugars submitted have been via the website, suggesting that submission via e-mail or cell phone is more appealing. Final results will not be obtained until all patients have been enrolled and have completed their three month trial period.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby David Alan Hanauer.en_US
dc.format.extent121 p.en_US
dc.format.extent8827088 bytes
dc.format.extent8841895 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.titleComputerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS) : using web and wireless phone technology to improve diabetes complianceen_US
dc.title.alternativeCARDS : using web and wireless phone technology to improve diabetes complianceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc57489952en_US


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