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dc.contributor.advisorJacqueline A. Lees.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEipper-Mains, Marcie A., 1979-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-09-27T18:46:43Z
dc.date.available2005-09-27T18:46:43Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/28867
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Biology, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves [54]-[66]).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe development of the immune system is a highly dynamic process, characterized by quickly and frequently changing cell types and numbers. The orchestration of cell growth and proliferation and also of cell death is a necessarily complex process, taking cues from a wide variety of sources. The nematode Caenorhabditus elegans has provided an elegant and simple model of the control of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, in metazoans. Apoptosis in mammals is regulated by pathways related to but more intricate than metazoans. Several key features define the onset of apoptosis in any given cell; these include DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation, "blebbing" of the plasma membrane, and subsequent phagocytosis of the resulting cell fragments by adjacent cells (Kerr et al. 1972 and Wyllie et al. 1980).en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Marcie A. Eipper-Mains.en_US
dc.format.extent50, [16] leavesen_US
dc.format.extent4023616 bytes
dc.format.extent4030350 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectBiology.en_US
dc.titleThe role of the Bcl-2 family in proliferation and apoptosis and in mediating the development of lymphatic diseasesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biology.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc60412771en_US


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