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dc.contributor.advisorJerome J. Connor.en_US
dc.contributor.authorScotti, Andrea, 1978-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-14T20:23:08Z
dc.date.available2005-10-14T20:23:08Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29408
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 46).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the design of a structure, one of the most difficult parameter to assess is how the initial condition of a structure will change with time. During its life span, a structure can be subjected to different loads, changes in geometric configuration and even changes in its mechanical properties. Among all factors that can affect the geometrical reconfiguration of a structure (i.e. settlements and overloads) creep is one of the most important given its inevitability and because of its persistent effects (normally estimated as ten thousand days). Due to the effect of creep, a structure tends to amplify its deformation under a given load condition over time, and the final deformation can even reach values five or six time grater than the initial ones. During the design, the fact that deformations grow with time can be a difficult condition especially for highly indeterminate structures like cable stayed bridges where the stresses are related to the geometric configuration of the structure itself. In concrete cable stayed bridges, in fact, the increase in the deformation of the deck and the pylons over time leads to a decrease in the initial tension in the stays with an obvious difficulty in the design phase of the structure. The first chapter of this thesis illustrates and explains one approximate method used to estimate the effect of creep on a concrete structure. The method proposed in this thesis is the "Age-Adjusted Effective Modulus Method". It was chosen among others because it is one of the most commonly used, and because it is highly accessible.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) In the second chapter, the Age-Adjusted Effective Modulus Method will be used in conjunction with the force method to study non homogeneous, indeterminate structure under the effect of creep. In this chapter a procedure will be introduced that enables the calculation of an initial value of the prestressing force in the stays that elides the effect of creep on tension. Bridge in Maine, USA (M.Eng Project. Alexander Otenti, Andrea Scotti, Richard Unruh III, 2004). The theory exposed in this thesis is a very powerful procedure that permits to simplification of the problem of creep in cable-stayed bridges, with easy calculations and with an iterative procedure.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Andrea Scotti.en_US
dc.format.extent56 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent1849964 bytes
dc.format.extent1849770 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleLong term behavior of cable strayed bridgesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc56138082en_US


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