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dc.contributor.advisorDaniele Lantagne and Peter Shanahan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGangemi, Alexa, 1978-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-24T16:01:14Z
dc.date.available2006-03-24T16:01:14Z
dc.date.copyright2003en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29549
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2003.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 119-124).en_US
dc.description.abstractSalt ponds serve several valuable ecological functions in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), although they have traditionally been undervalued and poorly understood. This thesis describes an ecological assessment performed to provide baseline information on salt ponds on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, to recommend a range of indicators to determine the water quality of a salt pond, and to suggest areas of further research to help maintain the value that salt ponds provide to the island. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for fifteen ponds on the island. These data consist of a descriptive habitat assessment including pond classification, shore characteristics, water characteristics, biota characteristics, specific pond descriptions, as well as macro-invertebrates and chlorophyll a levels sampled in each of the ponds. Findings are presented by salinity, housing density, nitrate levels, dissolved oxygen, macro-invertebrates, species richness, and chlorophyll a. To determine correlation between variables measured, data are then analyzed by pair regression analysis. Multivariate regression results are presented for three independent variables: species richness, chlorophyll a, and dissolved oxygen. In the multivariate regression analysis of species richness, the most significantly correlated factors are berm height, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate levels; chlorophyll is significantly related to temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrate levels, and salinity levels; and dissolved oxygen is significantly correlated with depth, berm height, temperature, and pH. The results of this study seem to contradict the original hypothesis-that salt pond health is adversely affected by human development. A series of recommendations are proposed including monitoring sentinel species and metrics, beginning an ongoing salt pond measurement program, performing a nitrogen balance for the ponds, conducting sediment studies on the ponds, and considering the implementation of buffer zones around the ponds.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alexa Gangemi.en_US
dc.format.extent124 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent7814989 bytes
dc.format.extent7814798 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleEcological assessment of salt ponds on St. John, USVIen_US
dc.title.alternativeEcological assessment of salt ponds on St. John, US Virgin Islandsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc52723173en_US


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