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dc.contributor.advisorSandra Lambert.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCookke, Jennifer F. (Jennifer French), 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-29T18:24:32Z
dc.date.available2006-03-29T18:24:32Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/32212
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 62-63).en_US
dc.description.abstractSynthetic leasing is a method used to provide off-balance sheet financing to a corporate entity for the acquisition and development of a commercial real estate asset. Recently, off-balance sheet transactions, specifically synthetic leases, have proliferated in connection with corporate acquisitions and with construction and development of corporate real estate facilities. Under synthetic leasing, the lease is treated as an operating lease for accounting purposes; however, for federal income tax purposes, the company will be deemed the owner of the property, thus offering the corporate user what appears to be the best of both leasing and ownership. Are synthetic leases all that they claim to be? Do they offer the user an advantageous hybrid of the ownership versus leasing options? And what are the risks and potential drawbacks of these lease types? This thesis examines each of these questions as part of the overall analysis of synthetic leases and their use within the corporate real estate setting. Research material is derived from two sources; existing research and writings of the topic, and personal interviews and case examples from three US corporations using synthetic leases. The conclusion that the work leads to is that synthetic leases are indeed an authentic means of structuring real estate to derive cost savings, improved financial ratios and preservation of company resources. However, the benefits are very situation- dependent and must be used after a thorough evaluation of all of the other transaction options.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jennifer F. Cookke.en_US
dc.format.extent63 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent4079693 bytes
dc.format.extent4084522 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleSynthetic leasing : a viable alternative for the corporate useren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc50060094en_US


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