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dc.contributor.advisorJonathan Gruber and James M. Poterba.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKnight, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Economics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-15T20:24:23Z
dc.date.available2006-05-15T20:24:23Z
dc.date.copyright2002en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/32713
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Economics, 2002.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis brings together three essays on issues in the economics of health insurance. The first study considers the effects of average per-patient caps on Medicare reimbursement for home health care, which took effect in October 1997. I use regional variation in the restrictiveness of per-patient caps to identify the short-run effects of this reimbursement change on home health agency behavior, beneficiary health care utilization, and health status. The empirical evidence suggests that agencies responded to the caps by shifting the composition of their caseload towards healthier beneficiaries. In addition, I find that decreases in home care utilization were associated with an increase in outpatient care, and had little adverse impact on the health status of beneficiaries. In the second paper, I examine the impact of Medicare balance billing restrictions on physician behavior and on beneficiary spending. My findings include a significant decline in out-of-pocket expenditures for medical care by elderly households, but no impact on the quantity of care received or in the duration of office visits. The third paper (written with Jonathan Gruber) explores the causes of the dramatic rise in employee contributions to employer-provided health insurance over the past 20 years. We find that there was a large impact of falling tax rates, rising eligibility for insurance through the Medicaid system and through spouses, and deteriorating economic conditions (in the late 1980s and early 1990s). We also find more modest impacts of increased managed care penetration and rising health care costs. Overall, this set of factors can explain about one-quarter of the rise in employee contributions over the 1982-1996 period.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Robin Lynn McKnight.en_US
dc.format.extent116 p., [4] p. of platesen_US
dc.format.extent7521418 bytes
dc.format.extent7528864 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectEconomics.en_US
dc.titleEssays on the economics of health insuranceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Economics.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Economics
dc.identifier.oclc51933926en_US


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