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dc.contributor.advisorNeville J. Hogan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarvey, Matthew Ren_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-15T20:36:04Z
dc.date.available2006-05-15T20:36:04Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/32872
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 51-52).en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research into the mechanics of walking indicates that a quasi passive wearable device could be created which dramatically reduces the metabolic energy used in walking especially when the wearer is carrying additional torso weight. Target population groups include military personnel who must carry heavy battle packs and body armor, hikers, letter carriers, and the quasi disabled. This latter group includes a significant fraction of the elderly who have reduced leg strength and/or higher weight torsos. The device is called PUUMA, an acronym for Personal Unpowered Universal Mobility Assistant. Though walking has been studied extensively, there appears to be a limited understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and potential energy of the torso when driven by legs that can store and release energy. This thesis introduces a simplified model which enables simulation of the entire walking process including the epoch following heel strike. One simulation goal was to explore the knee spring properties which enable lossless walking. Simulations show that there are two knee spring configurations which allow for lossless walking. It is also shown that the percentage of kinetic energy transferred to a knee spring can be a significant fraction of the torso kinetic energy.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) PIJUMA's basic idea is the incorporation of torsion springs at the knee joints which absorb torso kinetic energy following heel strike and then release that stored energy later in the step. An application of the capstan effect is introduced which enables a practical implementation of two knee spring configurations. In particular, the design allows the thigh and shank to be dynamically coupled to a microprocessor controlled knee spring thereby allowing both unimpeded leg swing and kinetic energy transfer to the knee spring. Another use of the capstan effect is introduced which allows for a microprocessor controlled brake that can freeze the knee at its maximum torsion and then release it later in the walking cycle. A design is shown which embodies the architectural ideas created. Several of the key components were designed, prototyped and tested.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew R. Carvey.en_US
dc.format.extent52 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent4944394 bytes
dc.format.extent4945171 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleA knee brace design to reduce the energy consumption of walkingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc62588430en_US


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