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dc.contributor.advisorDavid Geltner and Frederick Salvucci.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMisiak, Jodie Merceren_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-ilen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-19T17:35:43Z
dc.date.available2006-06-19T17:35:43Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/33048
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 149-154).en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom a regional mobility perspective, Chicagoland is in serious trouble. The current Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) funding shortfall is just the most recent evidence of major flaws in the region's transit governance and finance structures. Over the past two decades, there have been numerous reasons and opportunities to modify the regional approach to public transportation provision. Yet the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA), the area's transit oversight entity, never initiated a critical re-evaluation of its role. Ideally, the central goal of the RTA would be to enable ample transport options throughout the region. However, rather than fostering enhanced service and increased ridership levels, the RTA funding process has resulted in performance declines and has encouraged a divisive political environment. This is ultimately damaging to both the economic health and the global competitiveness of the region. Now, as Chicagoland faces a particularly severe budget crisis, it is time to finally begin the discussion that should have commenced two decades ago. The region must alter its approach to transit finance and an additional operations funding source must be identified immediately. The implementation of a region-wide, non-residential parking fee could help achieve both of these goals. When compared with the option of a sales tax increase, the advantages of a parking fee include: - It would encourage a greater sense of regionalism - It would have a rational nexus to auto mode externalities - The statutory incidence would not be on the general public and the magnitude would be minimal - It would serve as the impetus for a more merit-based approach to regional transit financeen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jodie Mercer Misiak.en_US
dc.format.extent156 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent13542533 bytes
dc.format.extent13551261 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleRegional parking fee : a potential funding source for transit?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc62120379en_US


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