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dc.contributor.advisorJerome Milgram and Ain A. Sonin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSabra, Gregory, 1977-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-13T15:11:29Z
dc.date.available2006-07-13T15:11:29Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/33274
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Ocean Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2003.en_US
dc.description"June 2003."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 150-151).en_US
dc.description.abstractAutonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) need to work in shallow water to complete oceanographic missions, coastal engineering surveys, and in military operations that involve reconnaissance and the location of mines along hostile coastlines. Control in the vertical plane is mandatory so the vehicle does not hit the bottom or broach the free surface. Control in the horizontal plane is necessary for planned missions and for returning to the "pick-up" location. The control of AUV's in shallow water is made more difficult by the effects of ocean waves. In deep water, most AUV missions take place at depths below the region of surface wave effects, but this is impossible in shallow (littoral) waters. At present, empirical control system parameters are altered for better shallow water behavior, and a minimum depth of operation is assigned, based largely on empirical grounds, for each wave condition. With a thorough understanding of the forces and moments on vehicles due to sea waves in these waters, improved control systems and vehicle designs can be achieved so that the AUV's will be able to operate in shallower waters and in larger waves than is now commonly done. For this thesis, experiments were conducted to determine wave forces and moments in shallow water. In addition, numerical results were collected using a panel method program that determines the forces and moments in various sea conditions neglecting lifting surfaces. The variation of these forces and moments with changes in water depth and vehicle submergence was studied to the extent that was possible. These results were used to model the wave forces and moments based upon selected input parameters. The resultant model is proven to accurately capture the collected data.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Gregory Sabra.en_US
dc.format.extent151 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent8680714 bytes
dc.format.extent8687105 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectOcean Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleWave effects on underwater vehicles in shallow wateren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Ocean Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc54402993en_US


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