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Mechanical Engineering (2) - Archived

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Mechanical Engineering (2) - Archived

 

Institutionally known as "Course 2," the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME) is the second oldest and second largest academic program at MIT. The editors of U.S. News & World Report , among others, consistently rank it the top graduate and undergraduate mechanical engineering program among North American colleges and universities. Its students are drawn from all 50 states and more than 50 countries. Its alumni are leaders in business and industry, education and government; they range from CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, to astronauts on the Space Shuttle, to award-winning scholars, inventors, entrepreneurs and innovators.

In 2005, Mechanical Engineering merged with the Department of Ocean Engineering (Course 13) to create a new department made up of approximately 75 faculty, 367 undergraduate students, 227 doctoral students, and 281 masters program students. Following the merger, the newly formed department retained its original name, the Department of Mechanical Engineering, which includes the Center for Ocean Engineering. As ME enters a new phase of its existence, it recognizes that its future lies in seven key "thrust areas" that will define its research and scholarly agenda. These areas have their foundations rooted in the Institute's 100-plus year history of research defined by the Scientific Method, their vibrant growth by the cross-pollination of interdisciplinary studies, and a potential yield of inventions and innovations only limited by the imagination and ingenuity of its faculty, researchers and students. They are:

More than two-dozen research laboratories and centers provide ME faculty, research scientists, post-doctoral associates and undergraduate and graduate students the opportunities to meet the challenges of the future by developing ground-breaking innovations today.

For more information, go to http://me.mit.edu .

Recent Submissions

  • Lauffenburger, Douglas; Grodzinsky, Alan (2004-12)
    This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and ...
  • Lang, Matthew; Kamm, Roger D. (2006-12)
    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic ...
  • Lermusiaux, Pierre (2011-12)
    This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and ...
  • McKinley, Gareth; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.; Sonin, Ain; Hosoi, Anette (2005-12)
    This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional ...
  • Herbein, David; McCoy, Timothy (2004-12)
    This course is an introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form. It also explores concepts of  intact and damaged stability, hull structure ...
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