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dc.contributor.advisorKrystyn J. Van Vliet.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sunyoung, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-28T15:18:20Z
dc.date.available2006-09-28T15:18:20Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34205
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 47-52).en_US
dc.description.abstractAtomic force microscopy (AFM) has been a powerful instrument that provides nanoscale imaging of surface features, mainly of rigid metal or ceramic surfaces that can be insulators as well as conductors. Since it has been demonstrated that AFM could be used in aqueous environment such as in water or various buffers from which physiological condition can be maintained, the scope of the application of this imaging technique has been expanded to soft biological materials. In addition, the main usage of AFM has been to image the material and provide the shape of surface, which has also been diversified to molecular-recognition imaging - functional force imaging through force spectroscopy and modification of AFM cantilevers. By immobilizing of certain molecules at the end of AFM cantilever, specific molecules or functionalities can be detected by the combination of intrinsic feature of AFM and chemical modification technique of AFM cantilever. The surface molecule that is complementary to the molecule at the end of AFM probe can be investigated via specificity of molecule-molecule interaction.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) Thus, this AFM cantilever chemistry, or chemical functionalization of AFM cantilever for the purpose of chemomechanical surface characterization, can be considered as an infinite source of applications important to understanding biological materials and material interactions. This thesis is mainly focused on three parts: (1) AFM cantilever chemistry that introduces specific protocols in details such as adsorption method, gold chemistry, and silicon nitride cantilever modification; (2) validation of cantilever chemistry such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), AFM blocking experiment, and fluorescence microscopy, through which various AFM cantilever chemistry is verified; and (3) application of cantilever chemistry, especially toward the potential of force spectroscopy and the imaging of biological material surfaces.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Sunyoung Lee.en_US
dc.format.extent52 p.en_US
dc.format.extent3055388 bytes
dc.format.extent3056447 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleChemical functionalization of AFM cantileversen_US
dc.title.alternativeChemical functionalization of atomic force microscopy cantileversen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc71300807en_US


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