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dc.contributor.advisorTimothy Johnson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Curtis Ben_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-06T16:01:27Z
dc.date.available2006-11-06T16:01:27Z
dc.date.copyright1989en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34306
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1989.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle as it appeared in M.I.T. Graduate List, June 1989: The use of daylighting in the design of a controlled environment for food reduction in the Caribbean and other equatorial climates.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 219-224).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses the use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other Equatorial climates. An expanding population has put a tremendous burden on the food production industry in these climates. The increasing population in these climates means that existing fertile land is being taken-over for housing and infrastructure. Furthermore, the fishing industry is also a victim of over-fishing due to a need for alternative foods. This design proposes a technological solution to this social problem. Presented is one answer to improve the fishing industry, through a controlled environment for intensive aquaculture production. To improve crop production due to depleting fertile land and flooding, this thesis proposes hydroponic cultures in multi-stories. In addition, the success of this farming complex is dependent on appropriate research by staffed scientists, seeking to continually improve the end products of this facility. Within this ecosystem, far greater yields will be attained than traditional forms of agriculture, and, aquaculture. The challenge here is to present the most economic solution. As a result, the design of this facility is based on a three-level hydroponic (crops growing in a nutrient solution) facility, a fish hatchery, indoor fish ponds, and, research laboratories within the aquaculture and hydroponic facilities. This thesis presents two design solutions :one on land, that addresses the issues of flooding and a depletion of available fertile land, and one at sea, that addresses a time in which the population has grown to such a degree that food production at sea becomes an economic reality. There are many ways to introduce natural daylight into this proposed farming complex. Intensive research has indicated that these methods can often range from the very simplistic to the very intricate, as displayed in new emerging technologies such as the Himawari system developed by La Foret Engineering, of Japan. However, the following are techniques that will be applied in this thesis to bring daylight into the buildings of this proposed farming complex : 1. Optical lighting Himawari system); 2. Perimeter lighting; 3. Reflective lighting; 4. Top/Core lighting. Research has indicated that even during the rainy season (July to December)- in some of these equatorial climates there is adequate available diffused sunlight to reach the crops and aquatic life within this proposed controlled environment. This thesis also addresses the energy and cooling load requirements that result from the use of daylighting. Once again the most economic design is presented in this case study. However, the resulting economic solution ( to meet the cooling loads ) that is presented for the proposed site in Trinidad, may not be the most desirable solution for other equatorial climates. Consequently, wind energy, solar energy, co-generation, and traditional electricity, are all analyzed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Curtis B. Charles.en_US
dc.format.extentvii, 224 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent11790316 bytes
dc.format.extent11800094 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleThe use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other equatorial climatesen_US
dc.title.alternativeThe use of daylighting in the design of a controlled environment for food reduction in the Caribbean and other equatorial climates.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc20667896en_US


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