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dc.contributor.advisorDonald R. Sadoway and John C. Cox.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSabia, Tracy L., 1976-en_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-08T16:25:16Z
dc.date.available2006-11-08T16:25:16Z
dc.date.copyright2002en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34718
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; and, (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; in conjunction with the Leaders for Manufacturing Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2002.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 56-57).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn today's aggressive business environment, many manufacturing firms are searching for new strategies or methodologies that will provide some type of competitive advantage. Recently, in order to address that issue, the automotive industry has adopted the process of Design for Six Sigma (DFSS). Based upon the philosophies of Six Sigma quality management, Design for Six Sigma focuses on the design and research phases of product design, as its name implies. Consequent to accurately identifying the customer requirements, the Design for Six Sigma process insists upon data-driven design decisions coherent with the consumer defined quality metrics. While the concepts of Design for Six Sigma and Six Sigma in general have been very successful for a number of large manufacturing firms such as General Electric and Motorola, it is not clear whether it will offer the same benefits for the automotive industry. Using the Parallel Hybrid Truck Program at General Motors Corporation, the largest US automotive manufacturer, as a case study, the implementation of Design for Six Sigma within the automotive industry is explored. It is obvious Design for Six Sigma will provide both advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, in order for Design for Six Sigma to be successful in the automotive industry, the following insights need to be captured and delivered upon. Leadership must be strong and demonstrate a consistent commitment to the process. Both the technical and cultural elements of the process need to be implemented successfully. Integration of Design for Six Sigma needs to occur with current improvement efforts, and coordination of efforts between various groups in the organization needs to exist Interestingly, these are classical problems facing the automotive industry for many years now, and they require a complete paradigm shift from the current automotive practices in order to be successful. Furthermore, to better substantiate the impact of Design for Six Sigma, the following improvements to the standard Six Sigma practices and strategy are recommended. A high level manufacturing position should be created to compliment the product engineering representative for the DFSS process. In addition, DFSS projects should be encouraged from the Manufacturing Organization to create buy-in and to leverage their day-to-day understanding of the product issues. Finally, like product specifications, Design for Six Sigma specifications should follow a product through the design cycle.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Tracy L. Sabia.en_US
dc.format.extent80 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent4174907 bytes
dc.format.extent4174713 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.titleSeisan! ... Ichi ... Ni ... San! : the kick of Design for Six Sigma in the automotive industryen_US
dc.title.alternativeDFSS in the automotive industryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc50633245en_US


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