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dc.contributor.advisorJames B. Rice, Jr. and Yosef Sheffi.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDisraelly, Deena S. (Deena Sara), 1974-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-08T16:37:25Z
dc.date.available2006-11-08T16:37:25Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34783
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program; and, (M. Eng. in Logistics)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, 2004.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 218-225).en_US
dc.description.abstractSeptember 11th, 2001 marks the worst terrorist action to occur on United States soil and opens a new period in history in which indiscriminate terrorist acts are possible, if not probable. Many of these possible acts, as well as the actions to prevent and recover, will have an impact on the supply chain and services in ways that we cannot yet understand. Previous research has focused on theft prevention and the disruptions such thefts might cause, and very little research on the supply chain impacts of September 11th exist. What is clear, however, is that as government agencies include the creation of public-private partnerships as well as the introduction of new technology, increasing inventory, and building system resilience, among others. Limited examples of public-private partnerships for security exist, however, there are several examples of partnerships for emergency response. Since both emergency response partnerships and security collaboratives share the same objective - to protect and secure the personnel, facilities, and supply chain - this thesis investigates emergency response, early detection, and propose new policies and regulations and the threat of international terrorism continues, corporate America needs to find a method for securing their operations. These methods may post-September 11th security examples to determine the key factors in establishing successful public-private partnerships. The learnings indicate collaborative partnerships and emergency response cooperatives are the most commonly used for promoting security and that motivation, cooperative goals, communication and trust are the most important factors to creating successful partnerships. Other factors vary by level of importance dependingen_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) on the type of partnership. Public regulation requires private cooperation in order to succeed. Similarly, private sector security relies on public sector concurrence. The greater the recognized interdependence between the public and private sector, the more likely the partnership is to succeed. Recommendations include introductory steps to creating such partnerships, as well as proposed actions which both sectors should consider to ensure partnership success.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Deena S. Disraelly.en_US
dc.format.extent225 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent14752547 bytes
dc.format.extent14752352 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.titlePublic-private partnerships : security and emergency response collaboration in a new threat environmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.in Logisticsen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc56726710en_US


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