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dc.contributor.advisorStephen Graves and Abbott Weiss.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSahney, Mira K. (Mira Kirti)en_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-08T16:51:16Z
dc.date.available2006-11-08T16:51:16Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34862
dc.descriptionThesis (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; in conjunction with the Leaders for Manufacturing Program at MIT, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 92-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis shows how a combination of macro-economic, business, and organizational factors can lead a well-run company to adopt a "launch-and-expedite" behavior with detrimental effects on operational efficiency. It also demonstrates how it is possible, for an organization that finds itself in such a state, to apply basic operations principles and a data driven approach to systematically get out of the "launch-and-expedite" mode. The thesis presents a method to characterize a real, functioning supply chain in the context of changing conditions and in the absence of perfect data. It shows the analysis, recommendations, and results from a particular supply chain case study at Agilent Technologies, Inc. The project first analyzes and maps the current supply chain to characterize demand and supply variability. A selected menu of operational building blocks is then recommended to improve overall supply chain performance by reducing the internal bullwhip effect and improving on-time delivery. The recommendations are implemented in a successful pilot study and key operational metrics are recorded such as supply chain inventory, on-time delivery, variability of lead-time, and number of expedite/schedule change requests.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) The particular organizational context of the project and its affect is also considered. Although this thesis provides a case study of the Colorado Springs Technical Center operations and supply chain, results and lessons learned are applicable to other component suppliers or component buyers within multi-node supply chains, particularly those in the capital equipment business.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Mark K. Sahney.en_US
dc.format.extent93 p.en_US
dc.format.extent5030729 bytes
dc.format.extent5034565 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.titleBuilding operational excellence in a multi-node supply chainen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc63675227en_US


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