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dc.contributor.advisorIan Condry.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPhoenix, Dorothy Annen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Humanities.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiala-ja--- n-us---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-18T20:02:50Z
dc.date.available2006-12-18T20:02:50Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/35076
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B. in Humanities and Engineering)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Humanities, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 50-52).en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Anime (Japanese animation) and manga (Japanese comic books) are extremely popular in Japan amongst consumers of all ages. In America and other non-Japanese countries, the international anime and manga fanbase is rapidly expanding. Yet, in some Western countries such as the United States, comic books and cartoons have traditionally been relegated to the realm of childhood, while in Japan, some anime and manga are targeted at child and adult audiences. Of course, these titles usually deal with issues that are not generally considered (in Japan and elsewhere) appropriate for children. However, even in some manga and anime targeted at children and teenagers, there are issues of sexuality and violence that the general Japanese public considers acceptable for younger audiences, while most American consumers probably believe that such content does not belong in children's media. How, then, does the American publishing and media industry reconcile these ideological disparities when importing and localizing Japanese anime and manga?en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Dorothy Ann Phoenix.en_US
dc.format.extent52 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent3124474 bytes
dc.format.extent3125383 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectHumanities.en_US
dc.titleProtecting your eyes : censorship and moral standards of decency in Japan and the United States as reflected in children's mediaen_US
dc.title.alternativeCensorship and moral standards of decency in Japan and the United States as reflected in children's mediaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.in Humanities and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Humanities.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc71249564en_US


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