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dc.contributor.advisorJanice A. Klein.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRivard, Robin Len_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-18T20:41:19Z
dc.date.available2006-12-18T20:41:19Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/35103
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, System Design and Management Program, February 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 90).en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent electrical architectures of land vehicles have shown a marked increase in networking and integration of electronic controls into traditionally electro-mechanical devices, which results in complex functional interactions throughout the electrical system. This trend often drives a large system change that modifies the engineering roles of the component level engineer and also creates a need for an evolution to a vehicle level systems engineering approach. In this paper, a claim was put forth that without a certain level of inherent discipline in place and functional, no successful large system change can occur. Inherent discipline was decomposed into three parts: process, personal, and organizational disciplines. Each of these was described and relationships between them were investigated. The correlation between parenting and organizational discipline was explored. A case for the business value of inherent discipline was made by examining two examples; one of organizational progress and one of manufacturing progress. Then a case study of an emerging large system change, feature ownership, was presented. Details on the engineering roles required for feature based development at each of the hierarchical levels of the electrical system were presented.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) Using the Design Structure Matrix as a tool, the interactions of the development process used for implementing distributed features were analyzed. Elements of inherent discipline required for a successful implementation of feature ownership were identified, as well as feedback from engineers in the organization implementing this large system change. The criticality of organizational discipline, in particular, to the feature ownership change initiative was emphasized. Recommended next steps for process, personal, and organizational discipline were detailed and possible effects of lack of discipline on feature ownership were postulated. The three types of discipline form a balance for the large system change initiative. The absence of any of the three can have a detrimental effect on the progress and effectiveness of the change, leading to poor quality, application or implementation of the change.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Robin L. Rivard.en_US
dc.format.extent100 p.en_US
dc.format.extent7083498 bytes
dc.format.extent7088716 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleInherent discipline required in large system changeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program
dc.identifier.oclc71356962en_US


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