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dc.contributor.advisorFiona Murray.en_US
dc.contributor.authorConde, Jorge Cesaren_US
dc.contributor.otherHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-18T20:45:27Z
dc.date.available2006-12-18T20:45:27Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/35131
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 63-64).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States population is aging, and the need for novel approaches to treat and manage disease continues to grow. Among the diseases that will impact this population, cancer remains a therapeutic area with significant unmet need. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries must continue to meet revenue and income growth expectations and will become increasingly dependent on novel drugs in their pipelines. In order for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to meet the demands of both patients and shareholders, productivity in the research and development process will need to improve significantly. In order to understand how best to improve the drug discovery and development process, it is important to identify potential sources of innovation throughout the process. Among these, an important consideration is to understand the paths that molecules take through the discovery and development process.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) This thesis used the marketplace of oncology drugs in development to test the hypothesis that novel molecules largely originate in academia, are developed by biotechnology companies and ultimately are licensed to pharmaceutical companies for commercialization. This thesis analyzed a database of 364 unique oncology small molecules and biologics entering Phase I clinical development between 1991 and 2002.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jorge Cesar Conde.en_US
dc.format.extent64 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent3366529 bytes
dc.format.extent3368378 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.titleAcademia versus industry as a wellspring of new ideas in drug discovery : the case of oncologyen_US
dc.title.alternativeAcademia vs. industry as a wellspring of new ideas in drug discovery : the case of oncologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology
dc.identifier.oclc71823745en_US


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