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dc.contributorHuang, Boyin.en_US
dc.contributorStone, Peter H.en_US
dc.contributorSokolov, Andrei P.en_US
dc.contributorKamenkovich, Igor V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2003-10-24T14:55:41Z
dc.date.available2003-10-24T14:55:41Z
dc.date.issued2002-09en_US
dc.identifier.otherno. 88en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://mit.edu/globalchange/www/abstracts.html#a88en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/3556
dc.descriptionAbstract in HTML and technical report in PDF available on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Website. (http://mit.edu/globalchange/www/)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 20-23).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe deep-ocean heat uptake (DOHU) in transient climate changes is studied using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) and its adjoint. The model configuration consists of idealized Pacific and Atlantic basins. The model is forced with the anomalies of surface heat and freshwater fluxes from a global warming scenario with a coupled model using the same ocean configuration. In the scenario CO₂ concentration increases 1% per year. The heat uptake calculated from the coupled model and from the adjoint are virtually identical, showing that the heat uptake by the OGCM is a linear process. After 70 years the ocean heat uptake is almost evenly distributed within the layers above 200 m, between 200 and 700 m, and below 700 m (about 20 x 10^22 J in each). The effect of anomalous surface fresh water flux on the DOHU is negligible. Analysis of CMIP-2 data for the same global warming scenario shows that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux to the deep ocean in our OGCM occurs mainly in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, since both the sensitivity of DOHU to the surface heat flux and the magnitude of anomalous surface heat flux are large in these two regions. The DOHU relies on the reduction of convection and Gent-McWilliams mixing in the North Atlantic, and the reduction of Gent-McWilliams mixing in the Southern Ocean.en_US
dc.format.extent33 p.en_US
dc.format.extent1054701 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Changeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReport no. 88en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://mit.edu/globalchange/www/abstracts.html#a88en_US
dc.subject.lccQC981.8.C5.M58 no.88en_US
dc.titleThe deep-ocean heat uptake in transient climate changeen_US
dc.title.alternativeDOHU in transient climate changeen_US


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