Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDaniela Rus and Kamal Youcef-Toumi.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoon, Yeoreumen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-10T16:56:58Z
dc.date.available2007-01-10T16:56:58Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/35654
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 139-143).en_US
dc.description.abstractA truss climbing robot has been extensively investigated because of its wide range of promising applications such as construction and inspection of truss structures. It is designed to have degrees of freedom to move in three-dimensional truss structures. Although many degrees of freedom allow the robot to reach various position and orientation, it causes complexity of design and control. In this thesis, the concept of modular robots is suggested as a solution to reconcile a trade-off between the functionality and the simplicity of a truss climbing robot. A single module has fewer degrees of freedom than required to achieve full 3-D motion, but it can move freely in a 2-D plane. For full 3-D motion, multiple modules connect to and cooperate with each other. Thus, modular truss climbing robots can have both properties: functionality and simplicity. A modular truss climbing robot, called Shady3D, is presented as the hardware implementation of this concept. This robot has three motive degrees of freedom, and can form a six-degree-of-freedom structure by connecting to another identical module using a passive bar as a medium. Algorithms to move the robot in a 3-D truss structure have been developed and tested in hardware experiments.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) The cooperation capability of two modules is also demonstrated. As a next step beyond truss climbing robots, the concept of a self-assembling truss robot with active and passive modules is presented. In this system, multiple Shady3D robots are employed as active modules and they become an active truss structure using passive bars. The procedure of self-assembling such a truss is demonstrated in computer simulations, which show a potential application in robotic truss assembly.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Yeoreum Yoon.en_US
dc.format.extent143 p.en_US
dc.format.extent7189696 bytes
dc.format.extent7195667 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleModular robots for making and climbing 3-D trussesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc76763954en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record