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dc.contributorJacoby, Henry D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2003-10-24T14:56:54Z
dc.date.available2003-10-24T14:56:54Z
dc.date.issued1998-11en_US
dc.identifier.otherno. 43en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://mit.edu/globalchange/www/abstracts.html#a43en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/3604
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 15-16).en_US
dc.descriptionAbstract in HTML and technical report in HTML and PDF available on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change website (http://mit.edu/globalchange/www/)en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current misplaced focus on short-term climate policies is a product both of domestic political exigencies and badly flawed technical analyses. A prime example of the latter is a recent U.S. Department of Energy study, prepared by five national laboratories. The 5-Labs study assumes —- incorrectly —- that technical solutions are readily at hand. Worse, advocates of short-term emissions targets under the Framework Convention on Climate Change are using this study to justify the subsidy of existing energy technologies —- diverting resources from the effective long-term technology response that will be needed if the climate picture darkens.en_US
dc.format.extent16 p.en_US
dc.format.extent47918 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Changeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReport no. 43en_US
dc.subject.lccQC981.8.C5 M58 no.43en_US
dc.titleThe uses and misuses of technology development as a component of climate policyen_US


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