Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLeslie K. Norford.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeSimone, Marken_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-03T17:03:53Z
dc.date.available2007-04-03T17:03:53Z
dc.date.copyright1995en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/37035
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1995.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe parameters for a dynamic, computer simulation model were developed. The parameters characterize the physical and geometric properties of a building shell, the internal and external building loads, the buildings secondary systems, and the plant or primary energy source. The purpose of the model is to provide a standard testbed for the evaluation of control algorithms and strategies related to variable air volume HVAC systems. This work was conducted in collaboration with, and under subcontract to Loughborough University of Technology, Loughborough England. The prototype building is a four level commercial, multi-use building and activities in the building include classroom / educational space professorial and student offices, and office / administrative. The building contains three air-handling units; one unit and the volume it serves provides the basis for the testbed. The model volume is divided into thirty four zones, each with its own single duct, pressure independent V A V terminal box with hot water reheat. A perimeter heating system, composed of hot water convectors, radiators and baseboard heaters, augments the room comfort control system. Local loop control in the mechanical room and for all but one of the zones is micro-processor based pneumatic actuated. One prototype direct digital control terminal box system was in use for a classroom zone. DDC control systems and motor driven actuators were substituted in the testbed for the pneumatic equipment. Zoning in the volume was redistributed into six zones; the supply and return duct system was redesigned to accommodate the simplified zone configuration. A survey was conducted to determine the availability of sub-one-hour solar and collateral weather data. Historically, data in this frequency has been collected, but, not reported. A relatively new program called the Automated Surface Observing System (AS OS) and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will eventually provide weather data at varying intervals down to one minute, depending on the type of information required. Daily and monthly summaries are available, however, resolution is reduced and averaged to one hour intervals. The SOLMET program, under the auspices of DOE, provides archived solar data at one hour intervals on CD Rom. Data is collected from twenty-six stations distributed around the United States. Collateral weather data is also provided with the solar data and for simulation purposes the SOLMET data provides the best resource.en_US
dc.description.abstract
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Mark DeSimone.en_US
dc.format.extent554 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.titleA standard simulation testbed for the evaluation of control algorithms & strategies related to variable air volume HVAC systemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc36815868en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record