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dc.contributor.advisorNazli Choucri.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMistree, Dinsha (Dinsha Farrokh Allen)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Political Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-20T15:46:37Z
dc.date.available2007-04-20T15:46:37Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/37196
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. and S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Political Science, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 150-156).en_US
dc.description.abstractWe implement techniques of graph theory to international trade in order to empirically inspect the international system of trade. Examining macro and submacro levels of the international system of trade from 1962-2003, we find the presence of a Scale-Free Network with a Multiscalar Hierarchy. Such structures are resilient to bottom-up economic collapse, but are susceptible to top-down and horizontal economic failures. Our findings are based upon an especially novel approach for examining submacro systems, applying latent community identification analysis to identify trading communities that are not necessarily formalized or institutionalized as trading blocs. Following this analysis, we examine the role of international institutions in the international trade network, specifically considering macro level institutions for stability solutions and examining the effects of joining a trade bloc. We find evidence that supports the intergovernmentalist framework, whereby certain types of trade blocs seem to succeed while others fail, leading to different results in integration and unification.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Dinsha Mistree.en_US
dc.format.extent172 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectPolitical Science.en_US
dc.titleDependence, independence, and interdependence in world politicsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.and S.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Political Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc71825747en_US


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