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dc.contributor.advisorLynn Fisher and David Geltner.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaas, Ryan J. (Ryan Joseph)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-27T20:26:37Z
dc.date.available2007-06-27T20:26:37Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37440en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/37440
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 43).en_US
dc.description.abstractIt has been estimated that over 150 real estate opportunity fund sponsors have emerged since the advent of the so called "Real Estate Opportunity Fund" industry. The industry, now more than 15 years old, has experienced significant growth since its inception. As the real estate private equity industry continues to mature and becomes more competitive, fund sponsors must ensure that they are best in class in all facets of their business, and the structuring of their investment vehicle is a perfect place to start. The purpose of this paper is to identify the most important fund level structuring issues facing real estate opportunity fund sponsors when raising a new fund. It begins by reviewing the history of the real estate private equity industry, specifically real estate opportunity funds. The study follows with a recounting of the industry's standard legal, financial, and tax structures for these funds. Finally, utilizing the results of a comprehensive industry survey and interview process, the paper gives an update of the current industry practices. After a thorough study, it is clear that a fund's structure will largely be determined by the investor makeup and the respective fund strategy.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) This fact implies that there can truly be no "one-size-fits-all" best practice. While no particular new best practices were uncovered, the results were very interesting, and they provide general guidelines for fund sponsors to follow given a variety of different circumstances.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ryan J. Haas.en_US
dc.format.extent52 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37440en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleReal estate private equity : structuring the U.S.-based opportunity funden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc123421708en_US


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