Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStanley W. Shepperd and David W. Miller.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Susan C. (Susan Cecilia)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-16T18:59:33Z
dc.date.available2007-05-16T18:59:33Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/37566
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 177-179).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe trajectory analysis and mission design for inspection of a host spacecraft by a microsatellite is motivated by the current developments in designing and building prototypes of a microsatellite inspector vehicle. Two different, mission scenarios are covered in this thesis - a host spacecraft in orbit about Earth and in deep space. Some of the key factors that affect the design of an inspection mission are presented and discussed. For the Earth orbiting case, the range of available trajectories - natural and forced - is analyzed using the solution to the Clohessy-Wiltshire (CW) differential equations. Utilizing the natural dynamics for inspection minimizes fuel costs, while still providing excellent opportunities to inspect and image the surface of the host spacecraft. The accessible natural motions are compiled to form a toolset, which may be employed in planning an inspection mission. A baseline mission concept for a microsatellite inspector is presented in this thesis. The mission is composed of four primary modes: deployment mode, global inspection mode, point inspection mode, and disposal mode. Some figures of merit that may be used to rate the success of the inspection mission are also presented.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) A simulation of the baseline mission concept for the Earth orbiting scenario is developed from the trajectory toolset. The hardware simulation is based on the current microinspector hardware developments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Through the figures of merit, the quality of the inspection mission is shown to be excellent, when the natural dynamics are utilized for trajectory design. The baseline inspection mission is also extended to the deep space case.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Susan C. Kim.en_US
dc.format.extent179 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleMission design and trajectory analysis for inspection of a host spacecraft by a microsatelliteen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
dc.identifier.oclc74279312en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record