Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorY.W. Lee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBose, Amar Gen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-28T13:07:26Z
dc.date.available2007-09-28T13:07:26Z
dc.date.issued1956en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/38918
dc.descriptionThesis (Sc. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, 1956.en_US
dc.description"June, 1956."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 113).en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: A physically realizable nonlinear system, like a linear one, is a system whose present output is a function of the past of its input. We may regard the system as a computer that operates on the past of one time function to yield the present value of another time function. Mathematically we say that the system performs a transformation on the past of its input to yield its present output. When this transformation is linear (the case of linear systems) we can take advantage of the familiar convolution integral to obtain the present output from the past of the input and the system is said to be characterized by its response to an impulse. That is, the response of a linear system to an impulse is sufficient to determine its response to any input. When the transformation is nonlinear we no longer have a simple relation like the convolution integral relating the output to the past of the input and the system can no longer be characterized by its response to an impulse since superposition does not apply. Wiener has shown, however, that we can characterize a nonlinear system by a set of coefficients and that these coefficients can be determined from a knowledge of the response of the system to shot noise excitation. Thus, shot noise occupies the same position as a probe for investigating nonlinear systems that the impulse occupies as a probe for investigating linear systems. The first section of this thesis is devoted to the Wiener theory of nonlinear system characterization. Emphasis is placed on important concepts of this theory that are used in succeeding chapters to develop a theory for determining optimum nonlinear systems.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Amar Gopal Bose.en_US
dc.format.extentiii, 113 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNonlinear systemsen_US
dc.subject.lcshTime-series analysisen_US
dc.titleA theory of nonlinear systemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeSc.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc148082096en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record