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dc.contributor.advisorWilliam Uricchio.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNadeau, James A. (James Andrew)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-19T20:23:11Z
dc.date.available2007-10-19T20:23:11Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39146
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Comparative Media Studies, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionLeaf 77 blank.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 74-76).en_US
dc.description.abstractOn March 23rd 1969 Boston's public television station WGBH broadcast a program titled The Medium is the Medium. The program was a half-hour long compilation of short videos by six artists. The six pieces ranged from electronically manipulated imagery set to the music of the Beatles to an attempt at communication between four separate locations through audio-visual technology. As the narrator, David Oppenheim, the cultural executive producer for the Public Television Laboratory, intones at the beginning of the show, "what happens when artists explore television?" What happened was a program unlike anything seen before. The Medium is the Medium was the result of the pairing of artists with engineers. This pairing was the brainchild of the Rockefeller Foundation, which decided to bring these two together in what was the Artists-in-Television program. Founded in 1967 it gave seed grants to two public broadcasting stations, WGBH in Boston and KQED in San Francisco. These grants enabled the stations to begin residency programs matching artists with members of their production staffs. Several of the artists in the program had made films but most were coming to this type of time-based art work for the first time. The Artists-in Television program gave these artists the opportunity to expand their ideas into an art from involving television technologies. It offered those working in more traditional media the technology and expertise to try their hands at a nascent art form, video.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby James A. Nadeau.en_US
dc.format.extent77 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.titleThe medium is the medium : the convergence of video, art and television at WGBH (1969)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing
dc.identifier.oclc123349020en_US


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