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dc.contributor.advisorPhilip M. Gschwend.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAccardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-en_US
dc.contributor.otherWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-19T20:24:56Z
dc.date.available2007-10-19T20:24:56Z
dc.date.copyright2003en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39160
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), 2003.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractSorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) fraction and adsorption onto a combustion-derived, black carbon (BC) fraction. To study BC adsorption, a 375ʻC thermal oxidation method was employed to remove OC and isolate the BC fraction. Test studies showed that nitrogen-containing macromolecules charred during this pretreatment causing a positive bias to the BC measurement. Meanwhile, the oxidation of relatively small BC particles underestimated the total BC content in non-charring samples. Models based on carbon oxidation were then proposed to estimate reasonably the total BC and OC contents of sediment samples. The adsorption of pyrene onto isolated BC particles was then studied by constructing a nonlinear isotherm, which was characterized with a BC-normalized distribution coefficient and a Freundlich exponent. Pyrene sorption to Boston Harbor sediment was then modeled as the sum of OC absorption and BC adsorption using the measured adsorption parameters and literature absorption values. Finally, literature reports of high PAH distribution coefficients from the field and nonlinear PAH isotherms from the laboratory were re-explained by considering BC adsorption.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby AmyMarie Accardi-Dey.en_US
dc.format.extent279 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en_US
dc.titleBlack carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbonsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentJoint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc52770175en_US


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