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dc.contributor.advisorDavid I. Kaiser.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShulman, Peter Adamen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-28T15:44:27Z
dc.date.available2008-02-28T15:44:27Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/39577en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39577
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D. in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology and Society (HASTS))--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, June 2007.en_US
dc.description"May 2007."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 298-318).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation asks how the United States physically built its global empire. Between 1840 and 1930, empire building involved the establishment of a network of naval bases and coaling stations. By focusing on energy, I reconceptualize the American overseas empire as neither inevitable nor geographically predetermined. I trace how coal shaped U.S. expansion, how this expansion influenced ideas about national security, and how these security concerns affected the global environment. Coal reveals continuities in American foreign relations that link overseas expansion to responses to the introduction of steam power into ocean travel. As the Navy sought coal, it progressively assembled the familiar contours of America's global reach. The dissertation addresses both global and local history. It shows how policy makers before the Civil War demonstrated tremendous creativity in initiating geological investigations, diplomatic arrangements, and commercial agreements in foreign territories. Between the Civil War and 1898, these approaches gradually gave way to a more singular effort by the Navy to control strategic ports around the world. Soon, coal was so central to the Navy that coaling strategy and technology formed a foundation for the education of elite officers at the Naval War College, where its study shaped the planning for future wars. Attention to Americans in Borneo, Japan, the Isthmus of ...en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityPeter Adam Shulman.en_US
dc.format.extent318 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/39577en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectProgram in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.titleEmpire of energy : environment, geopolitics, and American technology before the age of oilen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology and Society (HASTSen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society
dc.identifier.oclc174287742en_US


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