Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDaniel Whitney and Roy Welsch.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPadgalskas, Nicholas (Nicholas Keith)en_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-07T16:06:50Z
dc.date.available2007-12-07T16:06:50Z
dc.date.copyright2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39684
dc.descriptionThesis (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; in conjunction with the Leaders for Manufacturing Program at MIT, 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 67-69).en_US
dc.description.abstractAll manufactured systems exhibit some degree of variation. Manufacturing organizations should be aware of those parameters whose variation will impact product performance and customer satisfaction. Such parameters are called Key Characteristics. Their variation plays a large part in the success of manufacturing programs; planning for too little variation can lead to low production yields, while planning for too much variation can lead to over-design. The chance for low yields or over-design is referred to as variation risk. Although most companies realize the importance of understanding variation, many still have difficulty implementing variation risk management programs. For some the challenge lies in changing the organizational culture to operate in a concurrent engineering environment that implements variation risk management. For others who are ready to make the change, the challenge is more technical in nature: even if Key Characteristics can be identified, their variation may not be known, especially if used in a new product whose sub-systems have never been through the production line.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) This thesis addresses the challenges of variation risk management encountered during an internship at Raytheon Company, and presents a unique solution for overcoming a lack of information regarding Key Characteristic variability. Once information is obtained, analysis is conducted to assist with identifying trade-offs and making program-level decisions. Although many problems presented are unique to Raytheon Company, the concepts can be applied across a wide range of manufacturing industries.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Nicholas Padgalskas.en_US
dc.format.extent69 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.titleImplementing variation risk management during product developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Manufacturing Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management
dc.identifier.oclc175303691en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record