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dc.contributor.advisorSam Bass Warner.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeehan, Angela Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-04T20:49:14Z
dc.date.available2008-02-04T20:49:14Z
dc.date.copyright2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/40127
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionPage 143 blank.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 137-142).en_US
dc.description.abstractNow a permanently protected type of open space, the community gardens in Boston's South End began in the early 1970's as an effort to utilize vacant land in what was a predominantly low-income neighborhood. Since then, the South End has experienced steady gentrification and is now one of the most expensive neighborhoods in Boston. Despite these changes, the South End, due in part to its substantial supply of subsidized housing, has retained residents with a mix of income levels and is a neighborhood that is still known for its diversity. Much of the previous literature on the role and value of community gardens has focused primarily on low-income communities, and there has been little research on community gardens in gentrifying or similarly changing neighborhoods. The South End, therefore, is an ideal arena in which to investigate the past development and present-day role of community gardens in a changing neighborhood. This thesis examines the role of the South End's community gardens both as places in and of themselves and as part of the larger urban landscape and community.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) By taking the perspective of the community in the garden and the garden in the community, the study explores both the dynamics of the smaller communities within the gardens and their role as a unique type of open space in the larger neighborhood and community that surrounds them. Through in-depth interviews as well as archival and observational methods, it traces the historical development of a community garden movement in the South End and also examines the specific present-day dynamics of two case study gardens. The research finds that these community gardens reflect the qualities and dynamics of the surrounding neighborhood, both in terms of its positive diversity as well as its conflicts and tensions. Furthermore, community gardens are places where these qualities are uniquely engaged through the interaction of people of different backgrounds by means of their common interest in gardening. Finally, the community gardens hold unique value for non-gardeners both as open space and as gardens, and provide lessons for the potential benefits of developing and maintaining new community gardens elsewhere.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Angela Elizabeth Meehan.en_US
dc.format.extent143 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleCommunity in the garden in the community : the development of an open space resource in Boston's South Enden_US
dc.title.alternativeDevelopment of an open space resource in Boston's South Enden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc187304007en_US


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