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dc.contributor.advisorDonna H. Rhodes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOgawa, Akira, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-07T19:12:12Z
dc.date.available2008-11-07T19:12:12Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/43175
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, System Design and Management Program, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 95-96).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe satellite is a highly complex system due to the tight physical constraints, high reliability requirements, and the scale of the product. Except for some commercial missions, most of the satellites are designed from concept to optimally achieve their missions. Historically, the multidisciplinary team spent several months or even a year to finish the concept design. As the information technology revolution occurred in 1990's, Integrated Concurrent Engineering (ICE) was invented to reduce cycle time and reduce resources but with higher quality. It is a new method of real-time team collaboration based on the quantitative computer-based calculations. It was introduced with significant success by JPL/NASA and The Aerospace Corporation. Some organizations followed in using ICE and also confirmed that the design period was reduced from months to weeks. Despite the remarkable successes of the ICE application in the United States and Europe, it is neither used nor well known in other parts of the world. The Japanese organizations, for instance, provide complex products and show their presence world wide, but there is no report of an organization utilizing the ICE approach. They applied the concurrent engineering in manufacturing long ago. It is unclear what brought this situation. The ICE approach has been well examined from the systems engineering perspective but not from the cultural aspect. This thesis analyzes the ICE approach to identify the key factors for successful implementation and operation from both systems engineering and cultural perspectives through the case studies of a implementation failure in a Japanese organization and some successes in Euro-American organizations. Then, the author proposes several ways for successful implementation in the Japanese organization and proposes how the ICE should be approached and be utilized to leverage the design capability of the organization.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Akira Ogawa.en_US
dc.format.extent96 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleConcurrent engineering for mission design in different culturesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program
dc.identifier.oclc251478217en_US


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