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dc.contributor.advisorGeorge Stiny.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPantazi, Magdalini Elenien_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-11T16:57:43Z
dc.date.available2008-12-11T16:57:43Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/43753
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 175-178).en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the first application of computer programs to problem solving in the 1960s, computers and computational processes have been gradually introduced in the field of architecture to the point where today they are an inherent part of architectural practice and education. This extensive use of computers in architecture, however, occurs late in the design phase, at the stage of production of construction documents or representation of the final product, and so rarely are computers used to address the early design phase, that of creativity. A significant reason for this is that computational processes, based on algorithms, use explicit rules and unambiguous procedures, while the processes that architects employ at the early design phase are implicit and obscure. Whether a process is implicit or explicit, though, it is still underlined by a framework of interacting rules. Can rules, therefore, provide a bridge between explicit and implicit processes? The present research addresses this question through a design experiment with a group of professional architects. The experiment was in design composition from scratch and the scope was to identify the role of rules in the architects' design processes. In this framework a shape grammar formalism was developed to describe both the design activities and the end products. Architects were found to work towards a design solution by developing general rule schemas that gradually take the form of specific and explicit rules. It was also observed that this process is constantly informed and enhanced by the emergence of perceptual design events.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Magdalini Eleni Pantazi.en_US
dc.format.extent179 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleDissecting design : exploring the role of rules in the design processen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc269366366en_US


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