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dc.contributor.advisorJ. Phil Thompson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Cyden_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-30T16:33:56Z
dc.date.available2009-01-30T16:33:56Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/44333
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 88-90).en_US
dc.description.abstractServicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, commonly known as the GI Bill, was a transformative piece of legislation signed by President Roosevelt intended to help WWII Veterans transition successfully from soldier to citizen. Often dubbed the magic carpet to the middle class, provisions of the bill granted eligible veterans free college tuition, job training and placement, generous unemployment benefits and a low interest, no money down loan for a home or business. The effects of this bill were widespread; it touched eight out of ten men born in the 1920's. Much is known of impact GI Bill benefits had on white veterans, but less is known of how black veterans, who accounted for one in thirteen WWII Veterans, were able to use them. This paper examines barriers black veterans faced to access and use the housing benefit, and examines the possible intergenerational impacts such barriers had on the wealth and homeownership status of African Americans today.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Cyd McKenna.en_US
dc.format.extent92 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleThe homeownership gap : how the post-world War II GI bill shaped modern day homeownership patterns for black and white Americansen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow the post-world War II GI bill shaped modern day homeownership patterns for black and white Americansen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc276173994en_US


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